Walkthrough Design Examples

Creating a design using Teespring's designer

Let’s say that you’re making a simple design to raise money to help protect Manatees. You plan to donate all of the proceeds to the Save the Manatee Club. Because you aren’t affiliated with the organization directly you cannot use any of their branding or logo without their permission. That’s okay, you can still help generate awareness for their cause just with text.

Pick a shirt color and style
Light blue on a Hanes Tagless Tee is nice and alludes to the sea which is fitting for a Manatee
themed design.

 
Add your text and pick a complimentary text color
Write a simple statement on your shirt that relays your message, in the case of this example,
“Save the Manatee” Pick a darker blue from the designer. Now the shirt “pops” a bit. Great!

 
Pick one of Teespring’s fonts
Permanent Marker is a bold, handwritten font that speaks to the grassroots nature of this
cause. Add a slight rotation for some more visual interest and drama.

 
upload-artwork.png
Now, you’re ready to launch!
As one last tweak, you could rotate your text slightly to add more visual interest. Additionally,
you could look for an image to spice things up a bit.

 
Go to freepik.com and find a matching graphic
Search for “Manatee” and chose the graphic you like best. You have a few options for how
you can download it. You can use a PNG in the Teespring designer and the background will
be transparent, so it won’t interfere with the shirt.

 
Upload your artwork
You can now upload your Manatee PNG directly onto your Teespring shirt in the designer. If you want to change the Manatee’s color, you’ll need more sophisticated software like Photoshop, Illustrator or Inkscape. It’s not too difficult, but for now, stick with a black graphic.

 
 
Your shirt is finished!
You may want to rearrange your text to make room for your graphic but otherwise go ahead
and launch it! If you want to add colors to your Manatee (and maybe a font you can’t find in
the designer), see the next section.

Creating a design using illustrator

You like the font that you found in Teespring’s designer, but you think you can find a more “oceanic” feeling one. You also like your Manatee graphic, but you decide you want it and the text to be yellow.

With a few simple steps you can make the image you want in Illustrator.

Find an appealing font
Find free fonts on Dafont.com, Google Fonts or on one of the many other font websites. On
Dafont.com for example, browse or search by keyword and find a font that appeals to you.
In this case, you choose a font called Pacifico.

 
Download and install your selected font
You can open the downloaded file and install the font by using Fontbook on a Mac. On a PC, open Fonts by clicking the Start button, clicking Control Panel, clicking Appearance and Personalization, and then clicking Fonts. Click File, and then click Install New Font.

Compose the type and artwork to create your design
Type “Save the Manatee” in Illustrator, and pick a color that you like. You can return to Freepik and retrieve the SVG of the Manatee. Then open it in Illustrator and paste it into your document. Apply the same blue to the Manatee by using the Eyedropper tool and picking up the color on the text.

 
Create outlines and save your graphic as an EPS file
Before you make this into a shirt, you need to outline it so the text becomes an object. In Illustrator’s top bar you hit SELECT > ALL. Then choose TYPE > CREATE OUTLINES. If you save the outlined version as a transparent EPS it’ll be all t-shirt ready!

 
Upload your artwork to Teespring’s designer and start selling!
Compared to the beginner version of our shirt, we had a lot more control over the creation of the elements of this shirt, such as the font and color when we manipulated the image in Illustrator.

Creating an Advanced Design

With vector graphic skills, you can take your shirt to the next level. You can pick up design knowledge from a variety of sources online. Try Tuts+ or Lynda.com for some tutorials on Illustrator, Photoshop and basic design principles.

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